Best bonsai trees for indoors: Top 9 best indoor Bonsai for beginners

Many people think that most Bonsai spend all of their time Indoors. They may think that Bonsai are delicate and need the protection of an indoor environment.

That’s not true at all. Only tropical and subtropical plants can survive indoors where temperatures and light are high and stable throughout the year.

If you can’t provide that install an artificial light unit to grow the indoor bonsai trees properly. Here is the detail explanation about some best bonsai trees for indoors from beginner to advance.

The best Indoor bonsai tree species

There are plenty of indoor bonsai species on the market. Isn’t it better to find the best species to grow in your climate? Find the ones that suit you.

Ficus Bonsai Tree

Weeping Fig (Ficus Benjamina)

Willow Leaf Fig ( Ficus salicifolia)

Queensland umbrella or octopus tree( Schefflera actinophylla)

Chinese Elm( Ulmus parvifolia)

Fukian tea (Carmona microphylla)

Jade plant (Crassula ovata)

Mastic tree (Pistacia lentiscus)

Japanese privet (Ligustrum japonicum)

Olive (Olea europaea)

Placement of Bonsai

The obvious position for most indoor bonsai is close to the window. This is fine between the late spring and early autumn, but during the winter time the bonsai should be moved away from the window during the night to avoid frost damage.

Even with central heating and double glazing, the temperature between the window and curtain may drop very low. Light and temperature are very crucial point for the growth of a bonsai tree from seed.

Also note that, or indeed any indoor plant, should not be positioned on top of a television.

Ficus Bonsai Tree

all styles and varieties are good subjects for indoor bonsai. They can survive lower light levels. Among the many varieties the following are recommended:

Weeping Fig (Ficus Benjamina)

Ficus benjamina bonsai care

The weeping fig is a tropical plant. It has a short trunk with smooth, silver-grey bark and outstretched branches supported by numerous aerial roots.

best bonsai trees for indoors

Since this plant is already familiar to many people as a household and is relatively easy to keep, it is a good choice for cultivation as a Bonsai.

Position for Ficus benjamina

It can be kept indoors all year round in a warm, bright to a partially shaded spot.

It tolerates temperatures between 12 and 28*C and can be kept near a radiator.

It can also be moved outdoors in summer, either to a balcony or into the garden. However, it should be allowed to adjust to direct sunlight very gradually.

Soil
A mix of equal parts of fired clay particles, sand and potting compost. Other mixtures can also be used successfully.

The soil should be changed once a year. Older plants need be repotted only once every two years.

Watering
Use tap water that has been left to stand and water as soon as the soil surface feels dry or only slightly moist.

Feeding
From spring to autumn, with plenty of organic or inorganic fertilizer. Halve the dose in winter.

Willow Leaf Fig (Ficus salicifolia)

Ficus salicifolia bonsai care

This evergreen fig, which can reach enormous heights in its natural habitat, has lanceolate leaves arranged alternatively and at short distances along its branches.

This tree can be very easily trimmed into an imposing broom style. Although it often loses all its foliage if its care is disrupted or if there are any other changes in the external environment, it can also be grown by beginners.

Position for Ficus salicifolia

It can be placed beside alight source, by a window, but protected from the middy sun. It can be moved outdoors in summer.

When it is brought back inside, it usually sheds all its leaves. If placed in a warm room where the humidity level is not too low, it will soon produce new shoots.

Soil

A mix of equal parts of fired clay particles, sand and potting compost used as soil to grow this plant. Other well-draining soil mixes can also be used. If only tap water is used, half the soil should be changed once a year.

Watering

Keep it evenly moist. Once the fig has lost all its leaves, do not water again until the soil surface has drived out a little. Ordinary tap water is quite suitable.

Feeding
Every two weeks from spring to mid-autumn, otherwise just once a month. Use an organic or inorganic fertilizer.

Queensland umbrella or octopus tree (Schefflera actinophylla)

Queensland Umbrella tree bonsai care

This tree, a native of Australia and New Guinea, bears alternate, digitate leaves. Shefflera is very familiar as a houseplant notable for its durability.

best bonsai trees for indoors

Its large leaves and general disinclination to produce new branches.

It’s recommended for experienced bonsai enthusiasts as the cultivation process of the plant little bit difficult.

Position
It would be placed in a light and warm place but shaded from sun. Schefflera can be put outside in the warmer months, but should not be placed in direct sunlight.

In winter, the humidity level should not fall below 40%, otherwise the plant will become more susceptible to attack by pests.

Soil
A mix of equal parts of fired clay particles, sand and potting compost are used as soil mixture for growing this plant. Schefflera bonsai can also be grown in ordinary garden soil.

Watering
Tap water is perfectly suitable for this plant. Water it as soon as the soil surface becomes dry.

Feeding
Feed with organic or inorganic fertilizer every two weeks from spring to autumn, once a month in winter.

Chinese Elm (Ulmus parvifolia)

Chinese Elm bonsai care

The name ‘Chinese elm’ is used to denote several evergreen elms from various parts of Asia that have small, alternate, leathery leaves, dark green in color and oval in shape. The dark-grey trunk has smooth bark that furrows slightly with age.

Although the tree is quite often attacked by spider mites, it is one of the hardiest trees used by bonsai growers and can be successfully cultivated by beginners who have a cool room available for the winter.

Position
It would be placed around a bright and sunny spot. From spring to autumn, the Chinese elm will be quite happy out of doors, although it must be allowed to accustom itself gradually to direct sunlight.

best bonsai trees for indoors

Once outdoors, it will withstand strong wind and heavy downpours. The most suitable location in winter is an unheated room.

Soil
A mix of two parts fired clay particles, one part sand one part potting compost are used as soil mixture for this plant. Other soil mixes can also be used successfully.

Watering
Water the plant as soon as the soil surface has dried out. The Chinese elm will tolerate hard tap water.

Feeding
Feed with an organic or inorganic fertilizer once every two weeks from early spring to mid-autumn. In winter, if the plant is kept in a cool location, feed once a month.

Fukian tea (Carmona microphylla)

Fukian tea bonsai care

The Fukien tea, which takes its name from the eponymous Chinese province, is a native of Asia.

Its correct botanical name is Ehretia buxifolia, but its much better known by the synonym Carmona microphylla.

This evergreen shrub’s bark has an irregular surface that imparts the appearance of great age after just a few years.

This shrub has small, glossy leaves arranged in alternate groups of four, with three lobes at the tips and short, sturdy, light-colored hairs on the underside.

Position
It needs to be kept in a warm spot all year round. In summer, the Fukien tea can be placed in a partially shaded place outside.

In winter, when central heating sharply reduces humidity levels indoors, the plant should be placed on a tray filled with small hygroscopic pellets and water.

The Bonsai container should be placed on the hygroscopic pellets in such a way that the soil is not in direct contact with the water. The water should be topped up regularly.

Soil
Most plants are imported from China in very loamy soil. Watering very quickly compresses the soil, so that the roots are no longer receiving sufficient oxygen.

For this reason, the loamy soil must be changed as soon as possible. Since the Fukien tea is very sensitive to any reduction in its root mass, the soil change should take place in stages.

The replacement growing medium should consist of fired clay particles, which are similar in composition to the loamy soil in which the plants are usually imported.

Unlike this soil, however, the fired particles retain their granular structure for a relatively long time. When the plant is well established, it can be transplanted to a soil mix containing equal parts of fired clay particles, sand and potting compost.

The soil is best changed in spring. Young plants need to have their soil changed every two years.

Watering
Keep as evenly moist as possible. Rainwater is to be preferred, otherwise use tap water that has been left to stand for a good while.

If you forget to water the plant and the root-ball dries out totally, you can usually kiss goodbye to your Fukien tea.

Feeding
Every two weeks from spring to autumn with an organic fertilizer, and every four weeks in winter.

Jade plant (Crassula ovata)

Jade bonsai care

This succulent shrub is a native of South Africa and has opposite, rounded, fleshy leaves.

best bonsai trees for indoors

The sturdy branches are very evenly distributed along the length of the thick trunk, which becomes very gnarled with age.

Small, star-shaped, white or pale pink flowers adorn the new shoots in the spring.

Its tree-like appearance makes this plant a very good choice for cultivation as a bonsai, and since it is relatively undemanding it can even be recommended to beginners. It is often confused with Portulacaria afra.

Position
It can be placed in a bright place, if possible with direct sunlight. In summer, it can also be kept out of doors. Since it will not tolerate frost, it must be brought indoors in winter and placed in a cool room.

Soil
A mix of three parts fired clay particles, two parts sand and one part potting compost. Most of the soil should be changed every two to three years.

Watering
The plant should be kept evenly moist in summer. However, it will not come to too much harm if it dries out a little. In winter, it should always be a little drier. Normal tap water is quite suitable.

Feeding
Feed the plant every three to four weeks from spring to autumn with a fertilizer low in nitrogen. Do not feed in winter.

Mastic tree (Pistacia lentiscus)

Mastic plant care

This evergreen plant, which usually grows as a shrub, sometimes as a tree, is a native of the Mediterranean. It can frequently be found growing right on the coast.

The leaves are alternate and pinnate, and the individual leaflets of this wild-growing plant can reach a length of 5 cm(2 in).

Provided the atmospheric conditions in the room are suitable, the mastic tree can be considered an easy plant, suitable for a beginner to the art of bonsai.

Position
A light and partially shaded location is preferable for this plant. However, a mastic tree can also be placed by a sunlit window.

Although it will a dry atmosphere, it will not thrive properly unless humidity is higher. In summer, it can be moved out of doors. It must be allowed to accustom itself to the sun gradually.

In winter, an indoor location with a temperature lower than 18*C is desirable, for example in the window of an unheated bedroom.

Soil
The soil can be a mix of loam and sand for growing this plant. Other well-draining soil mixes are also suitable, for example one consisting of two parts fired clay particles, one part sand and one part potting compost.

Watering
The mastic tree can be watered with hard tap water when the soil surface is still slightly moist.

Feeding
Feed the plant once a week between early spring and mid-autumn with an organic fertilizer. In winter, feed once a month.

Japanese privet (Ligustrum japonicum)

Japanese privet bonsai care

This evergreen shrub, a native of Japan and Korea, has smooth branches that bear alternate, broad, egg-shaped leaves. The white flowers, from which poisonous black berries develop, are borne in large panicles.

If an unheated room is available as a winter location, then a Japanese privet can be grown by a beginner.

Position
It can be placed in a bright, partially shaded or sunny location if out of doors. From spring to autumn, the Japanese privet can be placed outside, either on a balcony or in the garden.

However, it must be protected from frost. it can be moved to an unheated room in winter.

Soil
A mix of equal parts of fired clay particles, sand and potting compost is used for growing this plant. Two-thirds of the soil should be changed every two year.

Watering
Keep the plant evenly moist. The plant tolerates temporary dryness. Ordinary tap water is quite suitable.

Feeding
Feed the plant every two weeks during the growing period with an organic fertilizer. In winter, the interval between feeds can be stretched to between four and six weeks.

Olive (Olea europaea)

olive tree bonsai care

As it ages, this evergreen tree develops a gnarled, furrowed trunk. It is one of the oldest cultivated plants in the world, and is particularly widespread throughout Mediterranean regions.

The leathery, lanceolate, opposite leaves, which vary considerably in length from variety to variety, are dark green on top and greyish-green on the underside.

The four-lobed, white flowers, borne in panicles, are followed by the fruits, which start off green and turn glossy black when fully ripe.

Provided an unheated room is available for the winter, olive trees can easily be kept as houseplants.

Position
An olive bonsai will flourish best in a sunny location, but can also be kept in partial shade. The tree’s development can be greatly assisted by moving it out of doors in summer, either onto a balcony or into the garden.

It should be brought inside again in autumn and placed in an unheated room where the temperature is between 5 and 18*C.

Soil
A mix of two parts fired clay particles and one part sand is used for growing this plant. Other soil mixes can also be used successfully.

Watering
As soon as the soil surface has dried out slightly, water with tap water that has been boiled or left to stand. If kept in conditions similar to those in its native habitat, it will require little water in winter. If it is kept in a heated room, it will need more.

Feeding
Feed the plant all year round with an organic or inorganic fertilizer. From the first new growth in spring to autumn the needs to be fed every two weeks; in winter, monthly feeds are sufficient.

Final words

Whether you are giving the trees as a gift or decorating your own office or home, the above are the best bonsai trees. Although this is not ultimate, You can also research further for best bonsai for your indoors.

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